Eating Enough to Reduce Urges to Binge, Part 2

This is Part 2 of the Series: Eating Enough to Reduce Urges to Binge.

You can read Part 1 by clicking on this link.

Eating enough.  Eating enough.  Eating enough.

If you say it enough times, does it make any more (or less) sense?

In the Series: Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting, I wrote about eating more throughout the day to reduce urges to binge.  Bingeing is often the result of dieting (under-eating). When you under-eat, your brain sends signals to you to eat, and not just eat, but overeat in a panicked, rushed, and uncontrolled manner–known as binge eating.

Often, bingeing involves eating foods that you have restricted while dieting and in very large quantities (but not always).  It is often done alone, in a short amount of time (but it can be with others and it can be drawn out over a day or a week or longer), and it is often followed by feelings of regret, shame, and guilt.

It is usually followed up with a period of compensation which may be self-induced vomiting, over-exercise, laxative use, or fasting.

After a period of compensation, a vow to never binge again may me made, and then a submissive and obedient return to dieting–extreme under-eating, may take place.

All to repeat itself again, and again, and again.

This is the nature of dieting and binge eating.

If you are in the habit of binge eating, it is worth taking a look at its issue holistically. Binge eating is generally not an isolated event.  It is usually preceded by a period of dieting, proceeded with a period of compensation, and then preceded again with repeated dieting.

So, what if you did not diet?  What if you removed the period of under-eating that led to your binge eating?

Take a moment and think about what your life might be like if you were not caught up in the cycle of diet, binge, diet, binge.

Does it sound too good to be true?  Does it seem impossible?

Take another moment to think about life not on a diet.

Does it seem scary?

This post is about eating enough, not about quitting your diet, but please know that the two go hand in hand.

If you are dieting, you are probably not eating enough (Dieting, on this blog, always refers to under-eating.  Your diet refers to the types of foods you eat.  There is a difference, at least for the purposes of this blog).

Reducing urges to binge is very hard if you are under-eating.

So, how do you know if you are under-eating?

Often under-eating occurs when adhering to a diet that extremely restricts calories. This is most diets and the signs that I share below show up for most people.  Not all, but most.

Below are signs that you are under-eating.  Please note that some of the physical and mental signs are the same, since our mentalities often reflect our bodily health.

Keep in mind the below lists are only some of the signs of under-eating and that they are rooted in sustained dieting (under-eating).  This means that they might not show up immediately.  They might take a few weeks, a few months, or a few years.  They might show up in a few days.  It will be different for everyone as each dieter starts their under-eating from a different set point.

Here are some of the physical signs:

  • You do not feel physically full or satisfied after meals.
  • Snacks, which serve to sustain you in between meals, don’t alleviate hunger.
  • You think about food more than when you were not dieting.
  • You feel hungry more than any other physical sensation.
  • You wake up in the middle of the night hungry.
  • You have lost weight very quickly.
  • Your sexual desires have lessoned (or seemed to have disappeared).
  • If you are female, your menstrual cycle has become irregular or has stopped.

Here are some of the mental signs that you are under-eating:

  • You think about food more than when you were not dieting.
  • Activities that used to interest you don’t seem very special anymore.
  • You talk about food more now than when you were not dieting.
  • You have stopped relating to others unless it is about your diet.
  • Your sexual desires have lessoned (or seemed to have disappeared).
  • You worry about upcoming events not aligning with your diet.
  • You suffer from depression, anxiety, panic, or fear when making decisions about food.

Like I mentioned, these are only some of the signs of under-eating.  They may present themselves rather early on or they may take awhile, but they are almost always inevitable the deeper someone gets into dieting.

Also, note that the signs for under-eating are often (but not always) the same as the signs for binge-eating.  Remember, the two commonly go hand in hand.

Do any of the signs look familiar to you?

If so, can you remember a time in your life that these signs did not characterize you physically or mentally?

Were you dieting then?

Please take a moment to really give these questions a good thought.

This post is only exploring how dieting effects us physically and mentally.  It is safe to do so, and may help you understand your approach to food better, so try not to brush it off thinking that it doesn’t apply to you.

I did that for years and it prevented me from breaking free from dieting and bingeing.

If you suspect that you are not eating enough and you have regular urges to binge eat, it is highly likely that you are not eating enough.  Your body is excellent at informing you of what it needs so pay attention to how it is directing you to eat, even if it is saying to binge eat because even this signal is meaningful to explore.

In the next post, we will talk about the actual act of under-eating.  What might it look like?  How it is different from simply eating less?

In the meantime, what did you think of this post?  Do you agree with the physical and mental signs of under-eating?  Have you experienced any of them?

Leave a comment to start a conversation!

Image from She Walks Softly.

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3 thoughts on “Eating Enough to Reduce Urges to Binge, Part 2

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