Eating Enough to Reduce Urges to Binge, Part 5

This is Part 5 of the Series: Eating Enough to Reduce Urges to Binge.

You can read the previous posts to this series by clicking on the link above.

Part 1 presented the idea that binge urges follow periods of dieting (under-eating).  Part 2 listed physical and mental signs of under-eating.  Part 3 gave samples of what under-eating might look like and Part 4 offered suggestions for eating more (eating enough) to reduce urges to binge.

In this final post for this series, Part 5, I will write about urges to binge after you are eating enough.  I wrote about this in the previous Series: Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting, Part 4.

Take a moment to read that post as it supports what is being written now.

For those people who have stopped dieting, are eating enough, and are still experiencing urges to binge, it is worth exploring something that will be very annoying for only a little while:

Urges to binge may have become a normal signal your brain sends to you in multiple situations that have nothing to do with needing to eat more.

It may be a habitual urge your body experiences.

Here is why:

Your first binge is truly an act of physical survival.  Your body is starved from under-eating, so your brains sends you overwhelming urges to eat.

You respond by eating as if it has been weeks since you have had a bite of anything.  It can feel frantic, rushed, right, and wrong all at once.  You can feel relieved and regretful at the same time, proving binge eating to be a very complex behavior.

After your first binge, you return to your usual senses, and likely to a period of under-eating to compensate for eating so much.

This perpetuates the cycle of binge eating, and it is all it takes to turn one act of binge eating into a habit.

Binge eating is a habit.

The next time you binge, it might be for the very same reason as the first time–under-eating. And the next time might be the same as well.

But now the brain is establishing connections between you and your environment when you binge eat.  Now it is not only about actually needing food, but also about whatever is happening in your life when you binge.

This could be, but is not limited to:

  • A time of the day.
  • A day of the week.
  • When you are alone and able to binge.
  • When you have eaten a particular food and then binged.
  • Before an activity.
  • After an activity.
  • Near a holiday.
  • When you visit specific people.
  • At a specific restaurant or cafe.
  • At a social event.
  • After a period of stress.
  • During a celebration.

It also connects binge eating with how you feel emotionally when you binge, and this could be:

  • Sad
  • Scared
  • Lonely
  • Frustrated
  • Anxious
  • Depressed
  • Happy
  • Relaxed
  • Nervous
  • Tired
  • Wired
  • Stressed
  • Confused
  • Indecisive
  • Rebellious
  • Hungry
  • Full
  • HIlarious

Do you see that signals to binge eat can be sent in any context once its habit is established?

You could be stressed for an exam or happy about an upcoming party and feel an urge to binge simply because your brain tied the two situations together from a past experience.

At this point it might seem like a lost cause to try to stop your habit, because it interferes with so much of your life, but don’t lose hope. You can change any habit at any time, no matter how long it has been taking place!

I hesitated to list all of the times and feelings you will encounter that may have a memory of bingeing tied to it because it is basically all of them, if you have been bingeing for a long time (or even a short time).  I wanted to list them to show how varied they are and how they really have nothing to do with the urge to binge.

Because urges have become a habitual signal you feel, your brain will continue to send signals to do something you no longer need (and haven’t since you resumed eating enough) when you encounter a time or feeling you had when you were dieting and bingeing until you stop obeying them.

This is why it will be very frustrating when you decide to stop binge eating.

Eating more throughout the day will certainly help to reduce urges to binge, but if you have a history of binge eating, like I did for 10 years, you are going to have to do more than just change your diet to include more nutrient dense food.

You are going to have to decide to not give any credit or additional thought to the urge to binge.

This is so important for stopping binge eating.

When you experience the urge to binge and you are not physically hungry, do nothing about it.

Don’t try to figure out why you have the urge.  Don’t feel badly about it.  Don’t try to manipulate the urge to mean something more than what it does.  It is just a habitual urge you feel.  Don’t assume it means anything.

The minute you start to engage with the urge is when it starts to influence you to act on it.

It does this by using your own language to convince you that you really need to binge.

You might say to yourself, “Just one bite won’t hurt“, or “I have been so good all week, so I deserve to have this“, or “I need a little fun in my life“, knowing that you don’t really want one bite (you want them all), and you’re not a dog who deserves treats, and if you wanted to have fun, you could go fly a kite.

Have you ever said these things to yourself before a binge?  I have.  They are pretty silly, but very common to think (or even say aloud) in response to an urge to binge.

If you start to engage in this thinking, you will likely binge–unless you put a stop to engaging with the urge right away.

When you hear yourself thinking about giving into an urge to binge, decide to recognize what is happening, accept it as something you will not do, then move on with your life.

This is not white-knuckling it or using willpower to not notice your urge to binge.

This is just not giving the urge your attention or respect.

It’s a meaningless feeling and it doesn’t deserve any more of your time.

Try it once.

Prove to yourself that you can do it.

Celebrate each time you do.

Then do it again.  And again.  And again.

It gets easier, and urges start to lose their intensity.  The come, they go, they are forgotten.

Will you try this?

It will be very difficult at first.

But only at first.  Just like any new habit, it becomes second nature soon, and it becomes simply what you do.

If you have been eating enough food for your body and you are experiencing urges to binge without being physically hungry, it may just be a habitual signal your brain is sending you, but it doesn’t mean anything, and it doesn’t have to be obeyed.

Begin to replace the memories you have bingeing with healthy and positive memories.

They add up quickly.

Will you try this?

It might change your life forever.

Leave a comment if you try this, there are so many people who can benefit from your courage!

This wraps up the Series: Eating Enough to Reduce Urges to Binge.  I hope it has been a practical source of information, and I hope you feel ready and inspired to stop dieting and stop binge eating.

You can do this!

Image from Etsy.

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Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting, Part 5

This is Part 5 of the Series: Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting.

You can catch up by reading Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4 by clicking on their links.

In Part 5, we will explore approaches and practices that will help make resisting urges to binge easier.

We have already discussed that dieting (extreme under-eating) causes your brain to send signals to binge eat, that binge eating, due to its many emotional and physical consequences, is usually followed by a period of compensation (as if to undo the damage of eating so recklessly), and that resuming the original extreme diet serves to repeat the cycle of restriction, binge, and compensation.

We’ve gone over how eating more throughout the day will help lesson urges to binge, thus, reducing binge eating, and reducing periods of compensation.

And we have gone over how noticing and accepting urges to binge after you return to healthier eating habits will help to alleviate the frustration you may feel for still experiencing urges to binge.

Today I wanted to talk more about a very helpful part of accepting urges to binge:

This is to remind yourself that the feeling to binge is just a feeling.  It is only a signal that your brain is used to sending.  It doesn’t mean anything more than that.  It feels uncomfortable, and it is distracting, but it will pass, and it doesn’t deserve any more attention or effort or public announcement than it takes to notice and accept it.

Choose to not act on a meaningless thought.

Then, be glad that you did not binge!

This part of stopping binge eating is often neglected, but it is a critical part of accepting urges to binge after you are eating enough and have decided to form new habits.

It may sound strange to remind yourself of these things, but if you have been binge eating for any length of time, it’s likely you have forgotten that not all thoughts must be acted upon.

We have many thoughts throughout the day.  Most of them are habitual and serve to keep us on schedule.  We think, “I will brush my teeth” after waking up, or “I’m leaving to go to work now“, or “I will do a load of laundry today“.  These thoughts are quick and keep us on schedule, and we tend to not second guess them.  If we did, we might not get very much done in any given day.

Other thoughts require much more research and attention, and we are lucky if we have the information and freedom to make our own choices regarding them (Where to go to college?  Who to marry?  What to do with my life?).

And then there are thoughts that seem to trip us up.  They feel more like desires or urges and they can be confusing to experience.

These are the thoughts that we have, but don’t want to have, and they become greater in intensity every time they are entertained and acted upon.

For the sake of this blog post, we won’t get into all of those thoughts.

The urge to binge, however, after you have ended extreme dieting, and returned to eating enough food, is indeed, one of those thoughts so let’s keep it as our example.

You think bingeing is what you want to do, but you also know it is what you don’t want to do.

It can feel very confusing, and be a stumbling block if you don’t know how to make sense of it.

When you have the urge to binge, notice it and accept it as an old way to think that didn’t serve you well.  That’s all it is (provided it is not a sign of true physical hunger).

You do not have to give this thought any more attention than this.  It is simply an old signal the brain is still sending, but it gets weaker and weaker every time you do not respond to it.  It fades.  It goes away.  It appears less.  But it takes a bit of effort to stop giving it so much attention.

Try this just once, the next time you have the urge to binge:

Notice it, accept it as an old way to think, remind yourself you don’t binge eat anymore, and let it pass.  You do this already, with lots of thoughts.  Try it with binge eating.

And then be glad that you did not binge!

Positive reinforcement helps most people (and animals) continue on their path to better behavior.  If it feels silly to give yourself positive reinforcement, you don’t have to, but there is nothing wrong with it and you might enjoy it.

I hope this is helpful.  If you are struggling with binge eating, there is always a way out.  There is always a way to stop.  And it is always within you to stop.  You don’t have to rely on external accountability or make a big deal out of stopping.  You do not need expensive therapy, or years of self-exploration.  You don’t need to right all of the wrongs from your past, or change anyone’s behavior, or do anything that is not only about stopping the action of obeying urges to binge.  Some of these things may help to lesson the urge to binge, or may be beneficial to your intellectual and emotional growth, but they are not mandatory actions to stop binge eating.

You only have to choose to stop, accept that is will be a bit weird for awhile, remind yourself that you have stopped, and then be happy about it.

It’s a simple process and it gets easier and easier the more you do it.

And if you do choose to binge, the next time you have the urge, accept your fallibility, dust yourself off, and get right back to living your life with kindness and patience.  Fail fast, don’t look back.  Eat enough, replace old thinking with new, and try, try, again.

You are still lovable and there is still so much life to live.

Never give up.  Always press on.

Does this seem like a doable approach to end binge eating?  Is it something you think you will try the next time you have the urge to binge?

Leave a comment if you like!

 

 

Image from Rebloggy.

Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting, Part 4

This is Part 4 of the Series: Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting.

If you haven’t already, read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

In Part 4, we will talk about experiencing binge urges after you have resumed eating enough.

We have already discussed that extreme dieting (under-eating) sends signals to your brain to binge eat, that binge eating becomes a habit, and that eating more throughout the day (ending under-eating) can dramatically lesson urges to binge, thus, lessoning binges, periods of compensation, and the likelihood of future urges.

Eating enough for your body is an adjustment period.  It takes trial and error to determine if you have had enough food if you have been in the habit of under-eating.  Often it will feel like you are overeating when you begin to eat enough.  Your body may need some time to adjust to eating enough so be very kind to yourself during this period.  Accept the transition as one that will help you stop binge eating.

This approach should help to encourage you!

The tricky part of binge urges is that while they begin as a survival mechanism your brain uses to keep you from starving, once activated, they become an automatic desire (urge) that is strengthened each time you obey it (each time you binge).

So, every binge increases the likelihood that you will binge again.

This may seem like unfortunate news, but it doesn’t have to be!

Instead, this news can serve you well.  Here is how:

When you feel the urge to binge you have two choices.  Obey it or dismiss it.  Since you already know that you do not want to obey it, you have to choose to dismiss it.

Part 3 of this series advocates eating more food throughout the day to lesson binge urges.  Feeling full and satisfied by your meals definitely reduces the urge to binge, but because of the many emotional layers that are intertwined with the physical action of binge eating, you might find yourself still experiencing urges to binge after you resume a healthy diet.

There are a few things you can do to dismiss the urge to binge that do not take much time and do not require a big fuss:

Ask yourself if you are physically hungry.  Physical hunger is located below the neck.  It’s a sensation in your stomach.  It’s a natural and non-threatening feeling that serves to keep you nourished and energetic throughout the day.

If your answer is that you are physically hungry–eat!

This is a simple solution that does not need alot of time, therapy, or work.  It only requires some food (or patience for you to get some food.  You may have to hold out until eating food is an option).

If you are not physically hungry, simply notice the urge to eat more (to binge eat).

When you notice the urge to binge, you are aware that your brain is sending signals to binge even though you are not physically hungry.

This can feel frustrating so the next thing to do is to accept the urge to binge.

Accept it?  But that sounds like giving up!  Like surrender!

It isn’t.  Not even close.  Accepting an urge is the kindest thing you can do for yourself in this situation.  Notice it.  Feel it (as uncomfortable as it is).  Accept it.  It is not you.  It is a signal your brain has been habituated to send.  Accept it.

How can you accept it?

Many ways.  You can silently (or even aloud) tell yourself that even though you feel the urge to binge eat right now, you are choosing to focus on whatever other task is in front of you in this moment.

You can breath deeply and imagine the urge being lessoned and becoming further and further away with every exhale.

You can remind yourself that your are being strengthened to stop binge eating in this very moment that you choose to not binge eat.  This is a rational and positive approach, but not necessary to stop binge eating.

None of these approaches require anything outside of yourself.  You do not need any special tools.  You do not need to go anywhere, or call anyone, or make any public announcements about your urge.

Just choose to not binge, accept the temporary discomfort of not giving into a meaningless urge, and if you wish, remind yourself that you are getting better at stopping the binge eating habit.

Then witness what happens next:

It passes.

It goes away.  It loses it’s distracting presence.  It fades.  It isn’t something you want anymore.

This approach has been incredibly helpful for me.  After I resumed eating enough for my body, my binge urges lessoned dramatically, but I would still experience them from time to time. Sometimes it was because I really needed to eat more food, but sometimes it was totally random.  In those moments, I had to choose how to move forward.

Modern therapy might encourage you to have a list of things to do for when an urge presents itself.  You might be told to journal, or call a friend, or take a walk, or paint your nails, or go for a drive.  These are all pleasant ideas, but not always an option if you have responsibilities other than breaking your habit to binge.

It is not always an option to go for a walk.  What if you are at work?  You cannot always call a friend.  What if they are out of the country?  And the worse (in my opinion) is painting your nails. Who wants to paint their nails when they are feeling an urge to binge?  I could never get behind that idea.

In my experience, I found that I didn’t even want to do any of those things when I had the urge to binge.  All I wanted to do was binge.  Going for a walk or getting involved in anything else besides eating was not my concern at all.

After I chose to stop binge eating, I wanted an approach to use anytime and anywhere, and I didn’t want to make it such a big deal that I was resisting an urge.  I didn’t want to pay any more attention to it than it was worth.

Accepting my binge urges helped me do this and I think it is worth trying if you find yourself experiencing urges to binge after you are eating enough.

It may feel funny at first, but all new things do.

It is worth trying because it might change your life for the better.

Next we will explore ways that make it easier to accept binge urges.

So, what do you think about choosing to accept the urge to binge?  Have you tried this already Did your urge lesson?  If it persisted, was it because you really needed to eat more food?  What finally led your urge to pass?

Please share your experiences by leaving a comment!

 

 

Image from Tumblr.

Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting, Part 2

This is Part 2 of a series so if you haven’t already, read Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting, Part 1.

In Part 1 of this series, we looked at how extreme dieting sends signals to your brain to binge eat.  These signals feel like urges to eat large amounts of food in a short span of time, uncontrollably, often alone, and often followed by feelings of regret, shame, and guilt.

It is dieting–extreme calorie restriction, that prompts the very first urge to binge eat, and it is likely that if you never felt the urge to binge, you never would.

Bingeing begins when you act on the urge to binge.  Binge urges are not the same as urges to eat regular meals and snacks.  They are overwhelming and consuming thoughts to eat in a trance-like state.  Often on foods that you have been restricting, often alone, often very quickly, often in fear.  It usually doesn’t start with the thought, “I will binge eat” (but it certainly can).  It might start with the thought, “I will have a little of this“, and then “Just a little more” and then, “I cannot seem to stop and I don’t want to and I may as well keep eating and start again on my diet tomorrow.

Binge eating has multiple effects on the body.  It rapidly increases insulin and floods the brain with pleasure chemicals, called dopamine (people tend to choose palatable foods to binge on, examples being foods combining high ratios of fat and sugar, which are pleasurable).  It initially feels relieving to binge because you have been starving on such an extremely low amount of food, and bingeing often (but not always) includes foods that a dieter restricts or limits.  It often feels like an out-of-body experience–you’re eating, but it doesn’t feel like you and even if you think you should stop, you usually continue until you physically cannot eat another bite.

Afterwards you regain your senses and feel like yourself again, but now you also feel overly full, bloated, tired, foggy, moody, and glad you no longer have to fight the urge to binge.   You may also feel regret, shame, guilt, and confusion as to why you just ate so much.  You might vow to never binge again.  The opposing feelings of relief and regret may have a very negative impact on you and it’s common to associate the foods binged on with these negative feelings.

There are many emotional layers involved in physically under and overeating.

To compensate for the reckless eating, most purge.  Purging is any attempt to undo the damage of eating too much during a binge.  It could be self-inflicted vomiting, but it could also be over-exercising, laxative use, or fasting.

When you resume eating after purging, you likely feel motivated to resume dieting so just like in the beginning, you eat restrictively and not enough.  Your brain, again, senses something is not right and assumes you are starving all over again.

You aren’t starving.  You may have even gained weight from binge eating, but the brain quickly senses the repeated period of food restriction.  It thinks you are starving.

So, in an effort to disrupt starving, it again, sends signals to binge eat.

Followed by regret and compensation, followed by another urge to binge.

And the cycle continues.

This is the habit of binge eating.  Once it is activated, and every additional time it done, it is reinforced in your brain to do it again, even though it has negative consequences.

To end the habit of binge eating, it will require determination to stop restrictive dieting and return to eating enough food throughout the day.  This may feel threatening to someone who is already fearful of weight gain, and may seem like an absurd solution.

But this is absolutely necessary to end the diet, restrict, and binge cycle!

In Part 3, we will go over how eating more will help lesson the brain-established pattern of binge urges, and a few common myths that keep people from the commitment to actually stop binge eating.

What do you think of binge eating being a habit formed by the brain to prevent starvation?  Do you agree or disagree?

Leave a comment to share your thoughts!

Image from Tumblr.

Why I Binged on Food for 10 Years

Not unlike many people, I decided I wanted to lose weight when I was in college.  I had gained the average 15 pounds (maybe more, OK, it was 30) and felt defeated that none of my clothes were fitting anymore.  I purchased a fitness magazine and starting tracking my calories online.

I followed a calorie-restricted diet and lost alot of weight.  I lost too much, but that is a topic for another post. While losing weight, I had extreme urges to binge on food, and I would binge.

During a binge I felt uncontrollable, not like myself, and powerless to resist my intense desires for huge amounts of food.  This was frustrating, to say the least.

I didn’t realize that I was not eating enough for my body to feel satiated.  I was starving.  Consequently, I would experience urges to eat uncontrollably at random times.  I always gave in, felt relief to finally eat and then, of course regretted it.  But I always obeyed the urge and repeated the cycle.

I did this for ten years.

My bingeing was followed by fasting.  I have never purged in the form of self-induced vomiting and I’m too lazy to work out for hours on end to burn off the extra calories.  I would rather just skip a meal (or two, or three).

I thought that once I started eating normal portions of food again and weighed a healthy amount,  the binge urges would go away and no longer disrupt my sanity. But they didn’t. The urges continued after I resumed eating more food.  This was confusing.

It made no sense that I would desire to binge eat when I was eating enough.

So I read alot on the topic.  I became obsessed at learning everything about this weird and embarrassing way to eat.  The best books I have read explaining binge urges are Brain Over Binge by Kathryn Hansen, and Taming the Feast Beast by Jack and Lois Trimpey.  If you binge eat, read these books.  If you have any habit you feel you cannot kick, read these books.

It turns out that bingeing is habitual.  It starts out as a survival mechanism the body uses to get enough food but then it seems to just be a learned behavior.  A habit.  A normal way to eat.

People often think bingeing is associated with a traumatic past or feeling insecure, or an inability to cope with stress.  I thought these things, too. But I examined my past and I could not find trauma that required harming my body with absurd amounts of food (actually, I couldn’t find trauma at all, I really enjoyed my childhood).  I took a look at my confidence level and didn’t find it low enough to demand binge eating, and I could think of alot of other coping mechanisms for my stress that did not involve eating food.

It perplexed me that I was bingeing. I would binge in many different emotional states.  It was not limited to stress.  It could be when I was happy or tired or apathetic or excited or afraid.  There was really no dominant pattern.

It became obvious to me that I was not bingeing to improve my life, I was doing it because I was doing it.  I did not like that I did it, but it was easy to do and became my normal.

It did not matter that I was a healthy weight and that I ate enough.  I had learned to binge and my brain would signal to do it and I would.  Every time this happened, I strengthened the habit making it more likely that I would do it again.

After I learned that my bingeing was a result of habit, I was able to separate my morality and sense of self from the urges I continued to feel.  They became less threatening and I learned that they were tolerable, resistible and even meaningless.

I did not resist my binge urges right away.  It took experimenting with resisting a binge urge, actually resisting it, and giving in to them for me to really grasp how they were influencing me.  I started to change my beliefs about binge urges.  I decided I no longer had to obey them and that I would be physically fine, and better off, if I didn’t.

Other people have had different experiences with this.  This is just my own.

It was exciting to resist urges to binge.  I didn’t die.  I didn’t feel very much discomfort, to my surprise.  I actually felt happy that I could decide to take better care of my body.  It was rewarding. I noticed that my binge urges were the strongest if I had not eaten enough throughout any given week.  They were stronger if I had overeaten at any one meal and they were strong when I would have foods high in sugar.  They were less when I ate more protein and fat.

Today I use my experiences with resisting urges to binge to my advantage.  I aim to eat protein, fat, and vegetables.  I avoid sugar (mostly) and processed foods.  I know these things help minimize and even remove binge urges so it’s worth it to me to be mindful of what I eat.

I realize that if I don’t eat foods that minimize binge urges, and I indeed experience the desire to binge, that I do not have to.  I never have to.  No one has to.

Knowing this, and because I believe it, my life has changed.  My thoughts have changed, too.  Bingeing no longer gets the best of me and I’m able to see it for what it is–a habit that can be changed.  My binge urges have lessoned tremendously and I’m able to enjoy life so much more.

When I do have an urge to binge, I notice it and allow it to pass.  It always passes.

What do you think about binge eating being a habit?  Have you had an experience with binge urges?  Do you tend to obey them or resist them?

Share your experiences by leaving a comment!

You can also email me at myrightmindblog@gmail.com.

 

Image from Under the Root.

Do You Want a Treat?

My little dog, Murphy, needs to get outside every few hours to relieve himself and get some fresh air.  We live in the city, but we try to make sure he gets time to play in the grass, and to keep up his canine dignity, do his business in nature.

Murphy loves to go outside because he knows that not only will he get a break from his throne (the living room couch) to spy on what’s happening in the neighborhood, but that he will get his T-R-E-A-T when he comes back inside.

Here is how it goes:

Murphy stands by the door and we make eye contact and I sense it’s about that time.  I ask him if he wants to go outside, he jumps off the couch and spins in circles as if to say, “Yes!  Let’s go now!” and we head outside for him to do his deeds.

While we’re out, Murphy takes note of all of the other dogs being walked by their masters.  He sniffs those that allow him and hides from the dogs that would obviously eat him alive if they were not on a leash.  Murphy’s only 6.5 pounds so he tends to hide from most other dogs.

We go back inside, Murphy does more spins (to show his excitement) and then he finally gets it–his treat.  I say, “Good boy, Murphy!  Do you want a treat?” and he sits up like a meerkat and practically inhales his treat.

Every.  Time.

This is Murphy’s habit:

QUE: He stands by the door and we lock eyes (followed by me giving Murphy a nod as if to say, “All right, let’s go!”).

ROUTINE: We go outside.  He does his work and does his dog-socializing.

REWARD: We come back in.  I tell him he is a good boy and asks if he wants a treat.  Of course he does.  He gets a treat.

Most of the time Murphy really needs to go outside but sometimes I think he only wants to go outside so that he can come back in and get a treat.  Actually, I know this happens and it seems to be happening more and more.  Lately, I have spotted Murphy acting as if he needs to go outside, but when he gets out he doesn’t do anything.  He still comes back in expecting a treat.

I’m not very disciplined with Murphy.  I usually give in to his scheme.  But I’m always aware of what is happening.

I don’t think we are much different than Murphy when it comes to how we eat.  If we pay attention, there are almost always queues and routines that occur before we give ourselves the reward of eating (for further research on this idea read Charles Duhigg’s The Power of Habit).

Most days I shower before breakfast.  I have usually just come home from a walk or bike ride and I get tidy before my coffee and morning meal.  I’ve noticed that if I take an extra shower later in the day, I almost always want to eat after I get out–even if I am not hungry.

The que is feeling like I need to take a shower, the routine is actually showering and the reward is a meal, but unlike Murphy’s approach, I simply cannot take showers and eat all day.

This is not the only routine-reward combo I have noticed that occurs when I feel like doing some non-hunger eating.  When I pay attention, I find there are many queues that leave me wondering into the kitchen, no matter what time of day it is or if I actually need food.

It’s funny how quickly we can become “trained” to eat based on habit and not real hunger.  For Murphy, it’s something as simple as strutting down the sidewalk, and for me it’s taking a shower.

Sometimes, these queues serve to keep us on schedule and help make decision-making quick and effortless.  Others times, like Murphy, when he goes outside with nothing to do so that he can come back in and get a Milkbone, I think I’m showering too much.

What about you? Do you notice queues throughout your day that stimulate the routine and reward effect with food?

Do you eat from hunger or habit?

 

Image from Flickr.