Enjoy the Weekend!

It’s the weekend!

Hopefully you can relax, be with friends and family, and do something fun.

Enjoy a little break!

 

Image from Kitsch and Retro.

 

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Memorial Day

It’s a new week, and it’s Memorial Day.

Here is an old photo of a U.S. soldier during the Vietnam War (1955-1975), in memory of all who gave their lives for our country.

Image from Vietnam War 50th.

Mechanical into Meaningful

Over the last two weeks I wrote two series on binge eating:  Binge Eating is Caused by Dieting and Eating Enough to Reduce Urges to Binge.

I felt they were a good introduction for understanding how binge eating starts, and an overall practical guide to limiting and lessoning the urges that accompany habitual bingeing.

But I felt mechanical writing them and it’s been bothering me.

I thought about why I would feel rather empty writing on a topic that I have so much passion for, and in a way (as lengthy series) that can possibly offer explanations to anyone who is caught up in, or knows someone caught up in, such a complex eating behavior.

I felt a little guilty for feeling this way.  I want to inspire people to maintain hope that it is possible to stop binge eating, not feel bored of the topic.

It dawned on me that even though both series began as a method to break down the complicated stages of binge eating, they seemed to have ended mechanically, a little drawn out, and out of obedience to finish an idea to create a series, rather than intuitive passion.

It felt redundant.  felt redundant.

While writing both series, the topic of binge eating was all I was thinking about, despite other activities that took alot of my time, and by the end of last week I was tired and felt the need to escape from all of my repetitive thoughts that fueled so many posts on one topic.

So, I took photos of my dog, and watched Blue Velvetand got lost in my latest Book Club story.

Anything to change the pace, and to challenge and encourage me with new content.

This got me thinking.

How much of what I do is out of routine and habit?  How much of what I think is a tract on repeat?  How much is out of obedience to a cause that I am passionate about, but not benefiting from?

How much is out of intuition and passion?

Don’t get me wrong.  Routine and habit are good things.  Obedience is a good characteristic to cultivate.  Rationality is good.  But when they are to things that leave you feeling tired, or more likely bored and empty, it is worth exploring why, and deciding on ways to break their chains of lifelessness–deciding to turn mechanical into meaningful.

I realized when I was writing so intensely on binge eating that I had alot to say about it. Binge eating is simple, but it’s also very complex, and I want to start a new conversation on it.  But as I wrote more and more, my interest became less and less, and by the end of each week, I was over the topic.  I just wanted to think and write and talk about other things.

This doesn’t take away the empathy that I feel for anyone struggling with binge eating.  It doesn’t mean it is not a worthwhile habit to explore or that it is not admirable to put the effort in to stop it so I don’t regret spending so much time and energy writing about it.  I don’t think it was wrong to, and I don’t think it was a waste of time.  Even though I felt very tired from it, maybe it helped someone, and that is fantastic.  Even though I felt tired, I still aim to spread hope that anyone can stop binge eating at any time, no matter what.

Similarly, I don’t think it’s wrong to give your life’s work to a single topic, or a single lifestyle, or a single anything.  I think you are lucky if you have a main passion, belief, or person in your life to expand with.

But that’s just it–expand with.

It’s really easy to get caught up in habits and routines that don’t do very much for us.  Maybe they started as good intentions, healthy changes, creative challenges, enlightening endeavors, but now they aren’t.  Now they are thoughtless, passionless, lifeless.  Now they leave us craving more, or caring less, or not caring at all.

This can happen with anything.  Your job.  Your lover.  Your clubs.  Your breakfast.  Your life.

It’s a good idea to confront your feelings of boredom and resent, when you have them, and find out what you believe about them.  Beliefs create our thoughts, which create our feelings, which evolve into actions.

Actions can be energetic, they can fill us with passion.  They can also be automated, mechanical, simply obedient, far from fueling.

Take time to explore your habits and routines and what you dedicate yourself to.  Does it empower you?  Does it challenge you to grow and expand in grace, creativity, love, compassion, empathy, acceptance for others, acceptance for yourself?

Do you think the world is more beautiful today because of how you intertwine with it?  That people are more endearing?  That possibilities are more possible?

It’s grueling and lonely not to.

This post seems an extreme response from two weeks of what I believe was mechanical writing. Maybe it is.

But it’s caused me to think, and explore, and remember why I write at all, and it propels me to grow and expand.

It’s not worth it to me to simply write information.  There is enough information out there with enough people passing it along.  There is enough reason and enough solutions and enough methods to keep you on a safe path.  To keep you from exploring.

It’s worth it to me to ask questions.  It’s worth it to dive deep into our approach to life, and to own it, and take responsibility for it, and to find that it’s what we make it.

It’s worth it to be convinced that it is beautiful, and that people are endearing, and that possibilities are possible.

As it relates to binge eating, to diets, to fitness, to health, it’s worth it to approach it rationally and positively, but also in its proper context.

Binge eating is a bad habit, but it’s not the worst thing that you have ever done.  Remember that.  Keep perspective.

Healthy eating and fitness will help you body thrive, but it’s not the end all of happiness and growth.  Keep it serving you.  Don’t become it’s slave.  Don’t forsake intuition and passion for the illusion of perfection.  Don’t play it safe following everyone else’s advice because you are afraid of making your own rules.  Don’t finish someone else’s race.

Decide for yourself why you care about these topics.  Decide to study and explore them and then make your own rules about how you will live them out.  Implement what works for you. Get rid of everything that doesn’t.

If you’re happy to obey diets and workouts, then go for it.  There isn’t any harm.  But if you have second thoughts about what is trendy or learn that what is popular doesn’t work best for you, don’t be afraid to jump ship and start over with what does.

This is different from simply reacting to feelings or waiting for inspiration to make a move with your health or with your life.  This is about modifying your approach to what you are engaging with so that you actually enjoy it.  About seeing things differently and celebrating how it helps you grow.  It’s about accepting information to help you expand, not kept put down.  It’s about changing habits and routines and beliefs so that you are more in tune and connected with them.

What do you think about routine and habit for obedience’s sake?  Do you find yourself enlightened by what you believe and do?  How do you mix things up when you don’t?

How do you turn mechanical into meaningful?

Leave a comment if you have anything to share!

 

Image from Devodotcom.

Old Photograph

It’s the weekend!

Have a happy time!

I’ve written two series on binge eating (here and here) in the last two weeks.

Today, I’m taking a tea break to admire an old photograph.  One of these days I will play golf and have a photo shoot in all primary colors.

What a great idea!

Until then, what are you doing to start the weekend?

 

Image from Pinterest.

What Diet Should You Follow?

http://www.gefrituurdekakkerlak.nl/

It can be overwhelming to know which diet to follow when you decide to eat healthy.

Raw?  Vegan?  Vegetarian?  Flexitarian?  Pescartarian?  Paleo?  Low carb?  Low calorie?  Gluten free?  Dairy free?  Sugar free?

There is an enormous amount of information on all of the diets that are being advertised today.  You can read a book on about them, or ask a friend how they eat, or do a quick Google search, and you are bound to find yourself with facts, evidence, promises and proof that each diet is superior to the next and you should be following it right this minute.

If diet information overload is something that has ever kept you from making food-related decisions, you are not alone.  Many people say that it is hard to know the truth about healthy eating and some people even put off improving their diet because they are not sure if what they are being told is actually good advice.

I’m a believer in finding the right diet for you and I know this takes time.  You need time to read about foods and to investigate health claims, but the biggest amount of time you need is to simply listen to your body as you eat and accept how foods either help or hurt you.

Every body is unique and will thrive eating in its own unique way.  Some people feel amazing when they eat less carbohydrates and others don’t.  That’s OK!  Some people choose to eat a little protein and others make it their main serving.  Again, that is OK!  There are people who eat lots of fruit and some that eat little and there are those that like more fat and those that prefer less.  It’s all OK!

Take time exploring different ways of eating and find a way that works great for you.  Pay attention to how you feel throughout the day, especially after a meal.  Notice your energy levels, your ability to concentrate, your mood, your digestion, your skin, your sleep and how your clothing fits (the same, tighter, looser?).  All of these things are effected by what and how much you eat.

Keep a journal if it is helpful and make notes such as, “my egg scramble kept me full all morning” or “one scoop of ice cream was great but two gave me a stomach ache” or “after a very large dinner, I woke up in the middle of the night and could not fall back asleep“.  I’m a huge fan of writing things out because it helps you gather information which provides you evidence to support your curiosity and goals.

After you have spent some time noting how foods make you feel, you will be equipped with experience to make the best choices for your body.  At this point all that matters is that the food you are eating works for you (that is makes you feel great!), no matter how it is praised or despised in a book, magazine, or blog or by your best friend, and that you enjoy its taste and texture.

It’s pretty simple (and can be quite fun!) once you get started.  Eat foods that help you feel amazing and avoid those that don’t and never worry about what anyone else thinks.

So, what diet should you follow?  Well, that is entirely up to you!  Do enough research (if you prefer) and listen to you body.  You will get the information you are after.

I hope this is helpful if you have ever felt “diet information overload”.  With more technology and ways to communicate it can feel difficult to decide on how to eat healthy, but you are fully capable of exploring and creating the perfect diet for you.

Enjoy the freedom and enjoy your new healthy life and leave a comment if you have tried this approach!

 

Image from De Gefrituurde Kakkerlak.

PRACTICE: Replacing Unwanted Thoughts

Replacing unwanted thoughts (about anything in your life) is a simple and rewarding practice.

Begin with the commitment to notice and observe your thoughts.  Simply notice and observe.  You are only gathering information about yourself right now, you aren’t condemning or teaching yourself any lessons.  It might be helpful to write your thoughts down on paper so you can see them or reread them aloud but you do not have to either of these things if you do not prefer.

When you are comfortable noticing and observing your thoughts, start to pinpoint those that are untrue and negative.  Untrue thoughts might be hard to identify at first so give yourself time to explore what you think.  You can explore by asking yourself questions about specific thoughts.  You can ask, “Is this something that can be proved or is it something I was told to believe?” or “Is this always the case or have I simply always told myself this?” or “What evidence is there that this a hard fact?“.  You can spot negative thoughts easier than untrue thoughts because they will be followed by negative feelings such as judgment, criticism or a general lack of compassion.

After you have pinpointed untrue and negative thoughts, immediately replace them with thoughts that are true and positive.  You might do this by thinking, “Even though I have thought this for a very long time, I know it has never helped me and I will choose to think on something that will be of benefit (your new true and positive thought) instead.

Follow this process up by reminding yourself that every time you replace an unwanted thought with one that is true and positive, you are strengthening your ability to think rationally and positively.  Do not neglect this part!  It serves as a rewarding reinforcement keeping you motivated at replacing unwanted thoughts.  Even if it feels funny or forced, do it.

Here is an example of replacing untrue and negative thoughts you might have when you “fail” or “break” your dietary goals with thoughts that are true, helpful and positive:

Thoughts: “I cannot believe I just ate that.  And so much!  I’m such an idiot.  I’ll never be able to eat right, I’m too weak.  I will just have a bit (but who am I kidding, alot!) more and then start again tomorrow.

Now apply observation, questioning, replacing and celebrating:

Oops, there I go again with untrue and negative thoughts about food and eating.  Let me stop and think about this for a moment.  Why can’t I believe that I ate this?  It is a delicious food and I’ve always enjoyed it and it’s available right here for me to eat.  Most people would surely eat it if they had the chance and they liked it as much as me.  Given this, it might be more strange if I did not eat it at all so it’s actually quite believable that I chose it, but I am not an idiot for it.  The truth is, even though I did not make the best choice right now, I am always capable of eating in a way that supports my dietary goals.  One snack or meal off coarse does not make me a failure, it just means I chose to eat foods or in a way that is not the best for my body.  Thankfully, my body does a very good job at healing itself and this act will not destroy me.  Even if I ate ten more servings of this right now I am not a failure because my food choices have no bearing on who I really am, they only contribute to the health and size of my body.  I have already proven that I can eat correctly (ways that I have decided keep me feeling great) so I know without a doubt that I can eat correctly again.  The reality is, I am a fallible human being, just like everyone else, and at times I will eat when I am not hungry or have foods that do not support my health goals, but right now I will choose to stop eating and do the kindest thing I can think of in this moment, which I know is to not overeat anymore.   I want to feel good when I wake up and I know that continuing to eat will only make me more full, more bloated and more likely to eat poorly again tomorrow.  I am pretty certain that the best choice for me is to end my eating now instead of waiting until tomorrow.  There, now, that was not so bad!  I am learning to replace my thoughts and I am getting better at it!  I think I will clean up and get on with my day.  There are still more things I would like to do.”

This is only one example of replacing unwanted thoughts with truth and positivity.  You can use this practice for any untrue or negative thought and with time it will become more natural and easier to do.

Try it out and leave a comment with your own experiences!

 

Image from Flickr.